Takeaway Menu

Café Sabarsky, the highly acclaimed Viennese restaurant that is located within Neue Galerie New York, has initiated a new take-out service, beginning September 23. The service will include both meal kits and cakes to go, bringing the cuisine that has distinguished this fine restaurant for two decades into the homes of its patrons. Each meal kit is prepared in serving sizes suitable for two people, including key ingredients, easy-to-follow instructions for preparation, and some historic information about the dish. Reusable stainless-steel canisters—The Sabarsky Takeout Container—are available for purchase from the Neue Galerie Design Shop ($28). Two layered stainless steel tiffin, the stylish containers are double-walled to keep food hot or cold for hours. Café staff will use these canisters to package food items upon request. Café Sabarsky is also delighted to offer cakes to go, so you can bring home some of your favorite Viennese desserts.

HOW TO ORDER

To order please email [email protected] or call +1 (212) 288-0665 24 hours in advance.
Pickup is available during Café Sabarsky hours: Thursday through Sunday 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. and Monday 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.

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MEAL KITS


CHICKEN PAPRIKASH

ORGANIC CHICKEN PAPRIKASH WITH SPÄTZLE

Austrian cuisine is heavily influenced by all the cultures found within the borders of the former Austrian-Hungarian Empire (1867–1918), which spanned throughout Central Europe. Chicken Paprikash originated among the farmers of southern Hungary, who supplied the peppers from which paprika is made, and two towns in the region—Kaloscsa and Szeged—are well-known for their excellent paprika. “Paprikás Csirke Nokedlivel” is one of the most famous variations on the paprika preparations common to Hungarian tables, which found its place in many Viennese cafés and restaurants.

$58 – MAKES 2 SERVINGS

To order please email [email protected] or call +1 (212) 288-0665.

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GOULASH

VIENNESE BEEF GOULASH

This dish traces back to the ninth century, and was typically eaten by Hungarian shepherds. Early versions did not include paprika, as this ingredient was not introduced to the Old World until the 16th century. Hungarian sweet paprika is now considered an essential part of the recipe.

Goulash is one of the few dishes that actually tastes better on its second day, after it is reheated. Serve with spätzle (Austrian tear-shaped pasta). Enjoy!

$58 – MAKES 2 SERVINGS

To order please email [email protected] or call +1 (212) 288-0665.

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BRATWURST

ROASTED BRATWURST, RIESLING SAUERKRAUT AND ROASTED POTATOES WITH MUSTARD

While sausage recipes can be found as early as 228 A.D., and although, some sources list over 40 different varieties of German bratwurst, the first documented evidence of the bratwurst in Germany dates from 1313, in the Franconian city of Nürnberg (Nuremberg). How these sausages are eaten varies by locality, but they are most commonly served with roasted potatoes, sauerkraut, rye bread, and spicy mustard.

$36 – MAKES 2 SERVINGS

To order please email [email protected] or call +1 (212) 288-0665.

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WEISSWURST

BAVARIAN WEISSWURST WITH WARM PRETZEL AND SWEET MUSTARD

A Weisswurst, literally white sausage, is a traditional Bavarian sausage made from minced veal and pork back bacon. The Weisswurst was created in Munich on February 22, 1857, and has since become a very important part of Bavarian cooking and lifestyle. Legend has it that the Weisswurst was invented by a mistake in 1857, when an innkeeper in Munich ran out of sheep casings for his Bratwürste and in order to feed his hungry guests, used tough and chewy pork casings instead.

$36 – MAKES 2 SERVINGS

To order please email [email protected] or call +1 (212) 288-0665.

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SPÄTZLE

SPÄTZLE, MUSHROOMS, CARROTS, PEAS, TARRAGON

The tradition of making “Spätzle” can be traced back to the 18th century, although medieval illustrations are believed to place the pasta at an even earlier date. In 1725, Rosino Lentilio, a councillor and personal physician from Württemberg, concluded that “Knöpflein” and “Spazen” were “all the things that are made from flour.” Since March 2012, Swabian Spätzle and Swabian Knöpfle have been awarded the EU quality seal for “Protected Geographical Indications (PGI)” and are protected throughout Europe as a regional specialty. In order to be able to bear this sign, one of the production stages of the product must have taken place in the respectively defined region of origin.

$36 – MAKES 2 SERVINGS

To order please email [email protected] or call +1 (212) 288-0665.

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CAKES


MOZART

MOZART TORTE

This torte is named after the classical composer Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, who was born in Salzburg, Austria. It is hard to pin down a classic recipe for Mozart Torte, as these vary considerably.

One thing that is clear is that the original cake was inspired by the dessert Mozartkugeln. Confectioner Paul Fürst first created Mozartkugeln in 1890 in Salzburg. It consists of spheres made out of Viennese nougat, which has a soft, truffle-like consistency, and pistachio marzipan covered in chocolate. Their popularity inspired the Mozart Torte, invented by Michael Prousek in 2005 for Chocolaterie & Grosskonditorei Aïda in Vienna.

Although developed more recently than Apfelstrudel and Sachertorte, this delicious cake is a modern classic!

$20 – 2 SERVINGS

To order please email [email protected] or call +1 (212) 288-0665.

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APFELSTRUDEL

WIENER APFELSTRUDEL MIT SCHLAG

Apfelstrudel is a traditional Viennese dessert, a pastry popular in Austria, Germany, the Czech Republic, Italy, and in many other countries in Europe that once belonged to the Austro-Hungarian Empire (1867–1918). The oldest known strudel recipe is from 1697, a handwritten recipe housed in Vienna at the Wienbibliothek im Rathaus.

Whether as a type of sweet or savory layered pastry with a filling inside, the strudel gained popularity in the 18th century through the Habsburg Empire. Austrian cuisine was formed and influenced by the cuisines of many different peoples during the centuries of the Habsburg Empire expansion. Strudel is related to baklava, which came to Austria from Turkey via Hungarian cuisine.

Apfelstrudel is considered to be the national dish of Austria, along with Wiener Schnitzel and Tafelspitz.

$18 – 2 SERVINGS

To order please email [email protected] or call +1 (212) 288-0665.

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SACHERTORTE

SACHERTORTE MIT SCHLAG

The world’s most famous cake, the Sachertorte, is the result of several lucky twists of fate. The first was in 1832, when the Austrian State Chancellor, Prince Klemens Wenzel von Metternich, gave his kitchen staff the task of concocting an extraordinary dessert to impress his special guests. As fortune would have it, the chef had fallen ill that evening, leaving the apprentice chef, then 16-year-old Franz Sacher, to perform this culinary magic trick. Metternich’s parting words to the talented teenager were, “I hope you won’t disgrace me tonight.”

Franz Sacher seized the moment and conjured up the confection of a lifetime, the chocolate cake that would go down in history as the ne plus ultra of desserts: the Sachertorte. The cake soon gained a cult following, and was deemed “presentable at court.” From then on, it was a favorite at the Imperial Court and soon went on to win the hearts (and palates) of the world.

$18 – 2 SERVINGS

To order please email [email protected] or call +1 (212) 288-0665.

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WHOLE CAKES


Whole Cakes

Café Sabarsky is also delighted to offer whole cakes to-go.

To order please email [email protected] or call +1 (212) 288-0665.

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