"GERMAN EXPRESSIONISM 1900-1930: MASTERPIECES FROM THE NEUE GALERIE COLLECTION" TO OPEN FEBRUARY 2013

"GERMAN EXPRESSIONISM 1900-1930: MASTERPIECES FROM THE NEUE GALERIE COLLECTION" TO OPEN FEBRUARY 2013


Colorful Expressionist Works Exploring Themes of Primitivism and Modernity to Show in Tandem with Important Gift of Decorative Objects

NEW YORK (January 7, 2013) — From February 7 to April 22, 2013, the Neue Galerie New York will present "German Expressionism 1900-1930: Masterpieces from the Neue Galerie Collection," an exhibition of prized works that will examine themes of primitivism and modernity, two poles of Expressionism that artists employed to free themselves from the academic conventions of the nineteenth century.

The engagement of these artists with the zeitgeist of the early twentieth century in Germany led them to paint emotionally charged, often contrasting scenes. On display will be both lively depictions of cabaret and circus culture, as well as cityscapes of lonely, alienating Berlin streets. Among the artists whose works will be on view are Max Beckmann, Lovis Corinth, Otto Dix, George Grosz, Erich Heckel, Ernst Ludwig Kirchner, Paul Klee, Franz Marc, August Macke, Hermann Max Pechstein, and Karl Schmidt-Rottluff.

Also on view from February 7 to April 22, 2013, the Neue Galerie will present a major gift of over 100 works of German and Austrian decorative arts from Los Angeles-based attorney and collector Harry C. Sigman. Diverse examples of graphic design, ceramics, metalwork, and glass from Jugendstil to the Bauhaus contribute to a more complete representation of these periods in the Neue Galerie’s collection. These pieces serve as an eloquent new tribute to the great flowering of the applied arts in Germany and Austria during the early twentieth century. The donation represents important works by a wide range of German pioneers, including Peter Behrens, Marianne Brandt, Hans Christiansen, Otto Eckmann, Rudolf Hentschel, Richard Riemerschmid, Henry van de Velde and Heinrich Vogeler, as well as major Austrian figures such as Josef Hoffmann, Koloman Moser, Joseph Maria Olbrich, and Jutta Sika.